The text and paintings on The Trowbridge Chronicles are taken from the illustrated journal of Violet Trowbridge, a shrew that once lived in a village deep in the Olympic Rain Forest. Each new post will represent a portion of Mrs. Trowbridge’s journal.

Saturday, October 11, 2014

WINTER PROVISIONS



Throughout the summer months Mrs. Trowbridge and her family were busy gathering provisions for the coming winter. In the above page she sketches and describes the basic comestibles that they required to survive the winter. By now their gathering tasks would be complete, and soon they would be using their twig bundles to heat their cottage as the temperatures would begin to drop and fall would turn to winter in the rain forest.

Sunday, September 21, 2014

MRS. TROWBRIDGE PAINTS A CONCH SHELL.



Mrs. Trowbridge enjoyed painting the odd novelty, found items, trinkets, knickknacks and sea shells. This is a sea shell that she painted that was typical of shells that are found on the shores of Polynesian islands. She enjoyed honoring her ancestors through her paintings. Over ions of time, the Trowbridge shrew migrated from the Mongolian Steppes across the Polynesian islands to South America, then their migration path took them north to their present habitat in the Olympic Rain Forest .

Have you seen my other blog, Bron Smith's Flights of Fantasy?

Monday, August 25, 2014

VIOLET TROWBRIDGE'S RHODODENDRON PAINTING



One of my favorite of all of Mrs. Trowbridge's floral paintings that are contained in her journal is this lovely rhododendron painting. She was undeniably the Grand Dame of watercolor in the Quinault Rain Forest. The notes in her Trowbridge Chronicles journal revealed that she spent 93 hours on the above painting.



My Trowbridge shrew research expedition to Polynesia several years ago was most fascinating. We found tiny petroglyphic evidence among the boulders in the forest and along the shoreline of the Trowbridge Shrew's presence on the tiny island of Motu Taakoka in the Cook Island Group (above). We even found bone fragments, including an intact skull. Look for more of Mrs. T's floral paintings in upcoming posts.

Have you seen my other blog, Bron Smith's Flights of Fantasy

Saturday, August 09, 2014

CAMELLIA FLOWER, by VIOLET TROWBRIDGE



If Shrew Khan was the King of Trowbridge Shrews, Violet Trowbridge was the queen. Her lovely watercolor paintings and hand-scribed journal became legendary throughout the Great Forest, today known as the Quinault Rain Forest. This camellia flower is part of her series of paintings commemorating her ancestors who lived in the Polynesian islands.

Have you seen my other blog, Bron Smith's Flights of Fantasy

Sunday, July 27, 2014

MRS. TROWBRIDGE'S RED HIBISCUS PAINTING



Every opportunity that came Mrs. Trowbridge's way was a golden opportunity. She spent many hours at the Huckleberry Hollow library studying about her ancestry. She was fascinated with her ancestors that had lived, oh, so far away in the Mongolian Steppes. And their migration across the South Seas to South America. 

So she seized the opportunity and began a series of paintings of the flowers that occur in the South Pacific islands where her ancestors had lived. I saw many red hibiscus such as the one that Mrs. Trowbridge painted above on my last trek to the South Pacific islands. 

Stay tuned for more of Mrs. Trowbridge's lovely floral paintings in future posts on this blog. 

Have you seen my other blog, Bron Smith's Flights of Fantasy?